Manuel I was conciliatory both to Isaakios (his uncle) & Isaakios (his brother)

Summary:
Isaakios Komnenos, the brother of Ioannes II and Manuel's uncle, had earlier been exiled for plotting to gain the throne, and had now been imprisoned by Manuel's agents for still planning revolution. When Manuel reached the capital, he recalled and pardoned him, asking his forgiveness, The other Isaakios, Manuel's brother, was summoned from imprisonment in the Pantokrator and embraced in a brotherly way. Against all expectations, despite his unpredictable and irascible temper, he was reconciled to Manuel and they pledged fraternal good will. Manuel gave a donative to the army and dismissed it, and also offered two gold pieces to every household in the capital 
Dates:
1143 
Isaakios Komnenos, son of Alexios I (Isaakios 102)
  • He was exiled by emperor Ioannes 2 for plotting to gain the throne, imprisoned by emperor Manuel 1'¬ís agents for still planning revolution; when Manuel reached Constantinople he recalled and pardoned him, asking his forgiveness (:) Kinnamos 32.8-22
Isaakios Komnenos, son of Ioannes II (Isaakios 103)
  • When his brother Manuel 1 reached Constantinople he was summoned from imprisonment in the Pantokrator and embraced in a brotherly way (:) Kinnamos 32.16-20
  • When Manuel 1 arrived in Constantinople and was crowned, against expectations he was reconciled to him, despite his weak and vengeful nature; the two brothers pledged fraternal love (:) Niketas Choniates, Historia 52.8-13
  • His character combined irascibility and tendency to inflict unacceptable punishments with extreme and unmanly timidity; as a result Ioannes 2 was blessed for having preferred Manuel 1 as his successor (:) Niketas Choniates, Historia 52.11-17
  • Though he was arrested firmly before Manuel 1 reached the capital, afterwards he was treated in a very conciliatory way, and was honoured and rewarded as an older brother for the rest of his life (:) William of Tyre bk. 15, 23.49-56
Emperor Manuel I Komnenos (Manuel 1)
  • When reaching Constantinople he freed his brother Isaakios 103 and recalled his uncle Isaakios 102 from prison and exile; gave a donative to the army and dismissed it, and gave two gold pieces to each household in the capital (:) Kinnamos 32.18-33.3
  • He anointed Michael 12 as patriarch, then was anointed emperor by him; against expectations, he was also reconciled to his brother Isaakios 103, and they pledged fraternal good-will (:) Niketas Choniates, Historia 52.8-11
  • In contrast to his firmness towards Isaakios 103 before he arrived in the capital, he afterwards became extremely conciliatory, was reconciled to him by family negotiation, and honoured and rewarded him for the rest of his life (:) William of Tyre bk. 15, 23.49-56